Bright Floral Knitting Wraps an Iconic Stratocaster Guitar in a Psychedelic Layer of Color

 Art Craft Music #flowers #guitars #knitting October 20, 2020 Grace Ebert “Flower Power” (2020), knitted wool and Fender Stratocaster, 106.7 x 12.7 x 38.1 centimeters. All images courtesy of The Big Art Auction, shared with permission A new piece by Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos (previously) envelops one of Fender’s Stratocaster guitars in a vibrant sheath of wool. Titled “Flower Power,” loosely knit petals cover the entirety of the instrument, wrapping the body, neck, and head in a kaleidoscopic bouquet. The fibrous webbing evokes the aesthetic of the 1960s when…

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Call for Art: Submit Your Work to Create! Magazine’s Next Print Issue Before November 1

 Colossal October 20, 2020 Grace Ebert There are just ten days left to submit your art for consideration in the winter issue (#24) of Create! Magazine, which will be curated by our editor-in-chief, Christopher Jobson. Create! has been dedicated to promoting the work of contemporary artists, curators, and entrepreneurs since it was founded by Ekaterina Popova in 2013. Today, the international publication spans digital, print, and audio platforms.  Find all the submission guidelines on Create! Magazine’s site—a reminder that Colossal Members receive 20% off everything in the store—and share your work before the November 1…

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Archaeologists Unearth a Nearly 2,000-Year-Old Cat Geoglyph Lounging on a Peruvian Hillside

 Art History #archaeology #cats October 20, 2020 Grace Ebert A new discovery on the side of the Mirador Natural Hill in Peru reveals that common feline activities—namely sprawling out in the most comfortable position—have remained relatively stable throughout the last 2,000 years. This week, archaeologists unearthed a 120-foot-wide etching of a cat at the Nazca Lines site in Peru, which is home to a series of geoglyphs depicting a spider, monkey, hummingbird, whale, and fish. The feline rendering dates back to the Late Paracas period between 200-100 BC, making…

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Napoleon Bonaparte died a Muslim ! The proofs are in the French national archives

Everyone thinks they know Napoleon Bonaparte, or more precisely the character of Napoleon Bonaparte through the French revolution, his institutions and his conquests. But if today we have decided to propose this article to you it is because this unpublished thesis will shake up the field of research on the History of France. We are thus going to mishandle some certainties, bring some realities, contributing to a new light on the character of Napoleon Bonaparte, through an approach which had as a common thread the link of filiation with our…

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An Interview with Director Lawrence Le Lam – BOOOOOOOM! – CREATE * INSPIRE * COMMUNITY * ART * DESIGN * MUSIC * FILM * PHOTO * PROJECTS

When I called you the other day you were eating something pretty unique and you related it to your filmmaking. Can you describe that snack and explain the metaphor again? For those who know me, know I eat a pretty weird open faced breakfast sandwich every morning. It’s comprised of everything I like: a slice of toasted sourdough, peanut butter, jam, Sriracha garlic chilli hot sauce, sometimes artichoke or spinach dip, kimchi, and peppered sunny side up eggs. That might sound gross, but it tastes delicious (don’t knock it until…

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Serene Photographs Frame the Fleeting Beauty of Light, Water, and Other Natural Elements

 Photography #flowers #light #nature #water October 19, 2020 Grace Ebert All images © Cig Harvey, shared with permission Cig Harvey is adept at spotting both nature’s sublime qualities and the beauty in mundane moments. The serene shots frequently feature a human intervention, like outstretched arms spotted with dots of light from a disco ball hung in Harvey’s home or a compost pile heaped with vibrant produce scraps. Spanning nearly 20 years of her practice, the photographs shown here frame instances of serendipity, whether showcasing bright pink azaleas briefly pressed…

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“The White Sky” by Photographer Mimi Plumb

Berkeley, California-based photographer Mimi Plumb (previously featured here), reflects on her Bay Area suburban upbringing and its resonance with the current times in her latest book, “The White Sky” (Stanley/Barker Books, 2020). Comprised of photographs taken throughout the 1970’s after Plumb left her childhood home in the California suburb of Walnut Creek for the counter culture of San Francisco at the age of 17, the series traces back through her suburban roots, exploring various communities around the San Francisco Bay Area. Looking back on the work now, Plumb notices parallels…

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Interview: Lisa Ericson Dives into the Threat of the Climate Crisis and Why She Chooses Magic Over Scientific Accuracy

 Colossal October 20, 2020 Grace Ebert “Anchor.” All images © Lisa Ericson, shared with permission In her hyperrealistic paintings, artist Lisa Ericson (previously) spotlights the myriad ways animal life and the natural world are connected, a theme she depicts by positioning various species on the backs of others and explains in a new interview. The vivid composites group marine and land creatures in unusual combinations that defy boundaries of habitat and authentic interactions. The underlying subject matter may be based on a real-world issue (coral bleaching, habitat erosion, etc.),…

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