“Grandmother said it’s okay” by Photographer Stefanie Moshammer

A selection of images from “Grandmother said it’s okay” by Austrian artist Stefanie Moshammer. Working at the intersection of documentary and staged photography, Moshammer explains that the first step of her process is observation— “putting myself in a place where I can observe to let a poetic insight come to the surface”. With her series, “Grandmother said it’s okay”, Moshammer explores childhood memories of time spent with her grandparents in their large home in the countryside of Upper Austria. “As a kid growing up in the city—in Vienna—the countryside was…

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Antique Watches, Cameras, and Medical Equipment Morph Into Meticulous Steampunk Spiders

 Art #found objects #sculpure #spiders #steampunk #watches November 10, 2020 Grace Ebert All images © Peter Szucsy, shared with permission For 25 years, art director and artist Peter Szucsy has filled his days with rendering the bizarre, sinister beasts that run rampant through video games. “I have made many creatures, monsters in the virtual world… but a few years ago I felt it is about time to create something different,” he says of his time working in the industry. “So I left my computer and made lots of my…

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A New Book Documents the Magnificent Experience of Swimming with Humpback Whales

 Photography #black and white #books #nature #ocean #underwater #whales November 10, 2020 Grace Ebert All images © Jem Cresswell, shared with permission Between 2014 and 2018, Jem Cresswell spent countless hours submerged in the depths of the southern Pacific Ocean surrounding Tonga. There he captured a group of humpback whales as they gracefully maneuvered around him, allowing the Sydney-based photographer to unveil the details of their grooved underbellies and barnacle-clad skin. The original project has culminated in a new book that documents the creatures’ movements and idiosyncrasies in striking…

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Stainless Steel Roots Sprawl Into Figurative Sculptures by Artist Sun-Hyuk Kim

 Art #anatomy #metal #roots #sculpture November 10, 2020 Grace Ebert All images © Sun-Hyuk Kim, shared with permission Just like a tree, the spindly branches that shape Sun-Hyuk Kim’s sculptures extend from a larger, sturdy limb—or in the South Korean artist’s case, neck or spine, too. Kim (previously) creates sprawling artworks that merge human anatomy and the root systems that crawl underneath the earth’s surface. Sometimes painted in neutral tones and others plated in gold, the sculptures are composed of stainless steel that trails out into figurative forms. Imbued…

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