Rollerskating Poodles and Croissant Characters Form an Adorably Eccentric Cast of Felt Characters by Cat Rabbit

 Craft Design #animals #felt October 23, 2020 Grace Ebert All images © Cat Rabbit, shared with permission Working out of her studio in Melbourne, textile artist Cat Rabbit (previously) felts a quirky troupe of characters complete with distinctive garb and accessories. A croissant-headed figure dons a striped skirt and floral hat, Pomeranians carry pin cushions on their backs, and four swaggering poodles outfitted with roller skates appear ready to compete in the rink. Some of the anthropomorphized creatures are particularly personal to the artist, like the blanket-enshrouded toad (shown…

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A Glass Floor in a New Dublin Grocery Opens a Window to Medieval Viking History

 Design History #archaeology #architecture #glass #video October 23, 2020 Grace Ebert  Embedded in the architecture of a new Lidl store in Dublin is a glass floor that allows shoppers to peer down into medieval history. During the supermarket’s construction, archaeologists discovered a 1,000-year-old home of Hiberno-Norse Dubliners, who were ancestors to the Vikings, in addition to a 13th-century wine jug and the below-stage trap of the former Aungier Street Theatre. Rather than excavate the items and build on top of the site, covering the ruins, the store installed…

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Multi-Story Murals Showcase Domesticity through Elegant Ceramic Tableware

 Art #ceramics #murals #pottery #public art #street art #tableware October 23, 2020 Grace Ebert Oviedo, Spain. All images © Manolo Mesa, shared with permission Spanish street artist Manolo Mesa merges public and private spheres through large-scale murals that highlight simple domestic objects. The multiple-story artworks depict traditional dining scenes, from an elegant porcelain tea set to a lone jug with swirling flourishes to another vessel resting on a saucer. To complete a recent tableau in Oviedo, Spain, for Parees Fest, Mesa explored the history of an abandoned pottery factory…

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“To The Pavement” by Photographer Alan-Michael Duval

Born in Port Chester, New York to immigrant parents from Trinidad and Tobago, fashion and documentary portrait photographer Alan-Michael Duval was raised on Long Island. Throughout his early life, his parents stressed the importance of education and perseverance, having immigrated to the U.S. to provide new opportunities to their future children. Duval’s earliest photographs were of cars, and he describes his newest series, “To The Pavement”, as a homecoming for sorts. Focused on low rider culture on the east and west coasts of the U.S., the project is ongoing and…

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“LIKE” by Photographer Ryan Debolski

Ryan Debolski is a photographer based in Detroit, Michigan. His first photobook, “LIKE”, published by Gnomic Book in 2020, was recently shortlisted for the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. Highlighting the experience of migrant workers in Oman, “LIKE” connects issues of exploitation with kinship in the age of social media. Predominantly from East Africa and the Indian subcontinent, the men Debolski photographs build luxury hotels and highways, fueling the expansion of wealthy nations. They communicate with each other using low-cost smartphones that help them to cope with the social isolation…

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Artists Explore Self-Expression Through Bizarre and Whimsical Masks at Denver’s Vicki Myhren Gallery

 Art Design History #COVID-19 #masks #sculpture October 26, 2020 Christopher Jobson Felicia Murray, “Our Dying Reefs,” felted COVID mask, 2020. All photos shared with permission. There is perhaps no symbol more representative of contemporary life than the humble face mask. A simple health device crucial to saving millions of lives around the world from a deadly COVID-19 pandemic spread by invisible airborne pathogens, and yet an object that’s been quixotically politicized at the callous expense of humanity for the gain of an elite few. A new exhibition at the…

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Bright Floral Knitting Wraps an Iconic Stratocaster Guitar in a Psychedelic Layer of Color

 Art Craft Music #flowers #guitars #knitting October 20, 2020 Grace Ebert “Flower Power” (2020), knitted wool and Fender Stratocaster, 106.7 x 12.7 x 38.1 centimeters. All images courtesy of The Big Art Auction, shared with permission A new piece by Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos (previously) envelops one of Fender’s Stratocaster guitars in a vibrant sheath of wool. Titled “Flower Power,” loosely knit petals cover the entirety of the instrument, wrapping the body, neck, and head in a kaleidoscopic bouquet. The fibrous webbing evokes the aesthetic of the 1960s when…

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Granite and Quartz Stones Carved to Appear Like Fabric and Clay by José Manuel Castro López

 Art #carving #rocks #stone carving #stone sculptures October 26, 2020 Christopher Jobson All photos © José Manuel Castro López. Spanish artist José Manuel Castro López (previously) transforms nondescript chunks of granite and quartz into squished and dough-like objects, as if each object morphed from solid to liquid and back again in the sculptor’s capable hands. López seems to delight in convincing the viewer that he works with stone as if it were clay. Lately, he’s begun to introduce additional objects that seem to stitch, clamp, or stretch the stones…

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“Talisman” by Photographer Kristina E. Knipe

New Orleans-based photographer Kristina E. Knipe photographs her community adorned in excess—of flowers, drapery, beer cans, ornate glassware. Photographed in crisp detail with a 4×5 camera, these tableaus—in some ways a nod to the altars, masquerades, and decadences of New Orleans—are a transformative experience for Knipe and her sitters. “To transgress the historic photographic ordering of society,” she explains, “I embrace mess and it’s attendant spectacle. Queer ritual disrupts engrained hierarchies, rejecting outmoded classifications.” She continues: “The concrete reality of those I photograph consists of the burden of maintaining mental health…

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